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We support both new and experienced pet owners in learning the best practices for your pet’s health and happiness.

Puppy Care

What vaccinations does my puppy need and when?

Vaccines protect your puppy from dangerous viruses by helping build and strengthen their immune systems. Puppies under 16 weeks who are not fully vaccinated with DHPP, should not be walked in public areas including dog parks, sidewalks, pet stores and animal hospitals.

There are 3 important vaccines to remember: DHPP, Bordatella and Rabies.

  1. DHPP:

  • DHPP protects puppies from Distemper, Hepatitis, Parainfluenza, and Parvovirus. It is commonly referred to as a ‘‘combo vaccine’’. DHPP vaccines are administered to puppies in a series of “boosters” or “boosts’’.

  • Starting at 6-8 weeks old, your puppy should receive their first DHPP vaccine. DHPP should be boosted every 3-4 weeks until the age of 16 weeks (or 4 months) in order to build up immunity while your puppy is growing.

  • At 16 weeks, your puppy will be given a 1 year DHPP vaccine.

    Note: depending on when and where you got your puppy, you might begin the DHPP boosts at 7, 8, 9 or 10 weeks old. You should still follow the boost sequence, every 3-4 weeks, until the age of 16 weeks, when can receive their 1 year DHPP vaccine.

2. Bordatella:

  • At around 8 weeks of age, puppies should receive their 1 year Bordetella vaccine.

3. Rabies:

  • At 16 weeks, your puppy is ready to receive their 1 year Rabies vaccine.

What kind of routine treatments should I make sure my puppy receives?

There are 3 important routine treatments to remember for your pup:

  1. Flea Protection - Start at 8 weeks.

    Continue monthly or use a 3 month dose.

  2. Heart worm - Follow the dose instructions that correspond to your puppies weight. If under 4 weeks old, give one dose and continue every 2 to 3 weeks until your puppy reaches 8 weeks of age. At 8 weeks old, give two more doses, each 3 to 4 weeks apart.

    Once puppy reaches 16 weeks of age, continue monthly.

  3. Tape worm - Follow the dose instructions that correspond to your puppies weight. If under 4 weeks old, give one dose and continue every 2 to 3 weeks until puppy is 8 weeks of age. At 8 weeks old, give two more doses, each 3 to 4 weeks apart.

    Once puppy reaches 16 weeks of age, continue monthly.

What kind of routine tests should I make sure my puppy receives?

  • Fecal tests reveal parasites that could be causing diarrhea, bloody stool, low appetite, lethargy and dehydration. Common parasites are Coccidia and Giardia. If untreated, these parasites can develop into an infection. Test yearly as a precaution and whenever these symptoms arise.

  • Heart worm tests reveal a cardiovascular parasite, which can be fatal. Once you receive a negative test, begin heart worm guard medicine monthly. Test yearly as a precaution.

  • Wellness exams should happen yearly, and whenever new symptoms arise. Your vet will examine your puppy’s ears, eyes, teeth, skin and overall health.

Other tests include urine, blood and parvo, when recommended by your veterinarian.

What should I feed my puppy and how often?

Puppies under 8 weeks old and no longer nursing with mom, should always have wet food and fresh water available to them. In order to grow and maintain health, young puppies need to eat whenever they are hungry.

At around 3-4 weeks, puppies can safely begin to wean off mom’s nursing. You can wean young puppies by integrating puppy formula into their feedings and overtime mixing in wet food. All food changes should be gradual.

At 7-8 weeks, puppies should be eating on their own, and you may incorporate a mix of wet and dry quality puppy food.

After 8 weeks of age, you can begin structured meals to feed your puppy 3-4 meals a day.

We recommend high quality puppy food that contains mostly protein and fat contents.

Puppies and food allergies - what are the signs?

Your puppy may be consistently vomiting shortly after eating; having diarrhea or losing appetite over the food you’re serving. This might be associated with introducing new food too fast or when your pup has too much activity after eating.

If symptoms persist, test for parasites. If there is no parasites or fleas present, your puppy may have a food allergy, likely associated with a protein ingredient.

Allergies to feathered protein, like chicken or turkey are common. Try single protein foods to rule out allergies. Examples of “featherless” diets consist of only beef, rabbit, or pork.

Discuss your options with a licensed veterinarian.

Transition to the new food slowly, introducing 25% of the new food into meals for a few days. Then increase the new food portion to 50% and so on.

Tip 1: We suggest canine probiotics, like Forti Flora, to be added to all meals.

Tip 2: Soothe your puppies stomach by boiling chicken, turkey or lean beef in water. Do not season. Add cooked rice and plain canned pumpkin. This can be fed for a few days to soothe stomach and calm any irritation in bowels while you are pin pointing the cause of irritation. Consult your veterinarian if symptoms persist.

How do I potty train my pup?

Potty training is all about creating a consistent and positive spot for your puppy to use for pee and poo! If they are not yet ready to walk outside (too young and not vaccinated), you can create a designated area using pee pads. It is your job to direct the puppy to his or her potty area.

Follow a schedule to direct them to potty after each meal, after each nap, and after play time until the puppy learns where to go on their own. When they are very young, you can implement potty time every hour to be consistent.

Do not punish your puppy while he or she is learning. Instead, redirect them to the correct area. As they go on their own in their designated area, praise them with a treat or extra petting. Be consistent and have patience!

Here is a great video on potty training that we recommend.

 

How do I leash train my pup?

Once puppies reach 16 weeks (4 months), and have received their DHPP vaccines, you can begin leash training outside. For puppies not fully vaccinated, you can practice using a harness and leash indoors.

Find a proper fitting harness that your puppy cannot slip out of. Have your puppy wear a collar and tag with your contact information.

Use treats to lead and praise them. We recommend practicing in quiet areas that are fenced in. Practice for short amounts of time until your puppy is confident.

Never pull a puppy while on a leash. If your puppy refuses to walk, kneel down to your puppy’s level to comfort him or her before trying again. Praise them for walking. If he or she still won’t walk, pick up your puppy and try again in an hour.

Kitten Care

What vaccinations does my kitten need and when?

Vaccines protect your kitten from dangerous viruses by helping build and strengthen their immune systems. Kittens should always be kept indoors. The average life expectancy of outdoor cats is 2 years.

There are 2 important vaccines to remember: FVRCP and Rabies.

  1. FVRCP:

  • FVRCP protects kittens from rhinotracheitis, calicivirus and panleukopenia. FVRCP vaccines are administered to kittens in a series of “boosters” or “boosts’’.

  • Starting at 6 weeks old, your kitten should receive their first FVRCP vaccine. FVRCP should be boosted every 3-4 weeks until the age of 16 weeks (or 4 months) in order to build up immunity.

  • At 16 weeks, your kitten will be given a 1 year FVRCP vaccine.

    Note: depending on when and where you got your kitten, you might begin the FVRCP boosts at 7, 8, 9 or 10 weeks old. You should still follow the boost sequence, every 3-4 weeks, until the age of 16. At 16 weeks, they can receive their 1 year FVRCP vaccine.

2. Rabies:

  • At 16 weeks, your kitten is ready to receive their 1 year Rabies vaccine.


What kind of routine treatments should I make sure my kitten receives?

There are 3 important routine treatments to remember for your little kitty:

  1. Flea Protection - Start at 8 weeks.

    Continue monthly or use a 3 month dose.

  2. Heart worm - Follow the dose instructions that correspond to your kitten’s weight. If under 4 weeks old, give one dose and continue every 2 to 3 weeks until your kitten reaches 8 weeks of age. At 8 weeks old, give two more doses, each 3 to 4 weeks apart.

    Once your kitten reaches 16 weeks of age, continue monthly.

  3. Tape worm - Follow the dose instructions that correspond to your kitten’s weight. If under 4 weeks old, give one dose and continue every 2 to 3 weeks until kitten is 8 weeks of age. At 8 weeks old, give two more doses, each 3 to 4 weeks apart.

    Once your kitten reaches 16 weeks of age, continue every 3 months.


What kind of routine tests should I make sure my kitten receives?

  • Fecal tests reveal parasites that could be causing diarrhea, bloody stool, low appetite, lethargy and dehydration. Common parasites are Coccidia and Giardia. If untreated, these parasites can develop into an infection. Test yearly as a precaution and whenever these symptoms arise.

  • FELV/FIV tests reveal a feline leukemia disease and feline immunodeficiency virus (contagious to cats). Newly adopted or rescued kittens should be tested. Any outdoor cats coming into your home should be tested. Continue yearly.

  • Wellness exams should happen yearly, and whenever new symptoms arise. Your vet will examine your kitten’s ears, eyes, teeth, skin and overall health.

Other tests include urine and blood, when recommended by your veterinarian.


What should I feed my kitten and how often?

Kittens under 8 weeks old and no longer nursing with mom, should always have wet food and fresh water available to them. Baby kittens may need your help initially, so try hand feeding them. In order to grow and maintain health, young kittens need to eat whenever they are hungry.

At around 3-4 weeks, kittens can safely begin to wean off mom’s nursing. This is common for rescue kittens who are often found without mom, have been moved or lost. You can wean young kittens by integrating kitten formula into their feedings and overtime mixing in wet food. All food changes should be gradual.

At 7-8 weeks, kittens should be eating on their own, and you may incorporate a mix of wet and dry quality kitten food. After 8 weeks of age, you can begin structured meals to feed your kitten 3-4 meals a day.

We recommend high quality kitten food that contains mostly protein and fat contents.

Kittens and food allergies - what are the signs?

Your kitten may be consistently vomiting shortly after eating; having diarrhea or losing appetite over the food you’re serving. This might be associated with introducing new food too fast or when your kitty eats too fast or plays too soon after eating.

If symptoms persist, test for parasites. If there is no parasites present, your kitten may have a food allergy, likely associated with a protein ingredient.

Allergies to feathered protein, like chicken or turkey are common. Try single protein foods to rule out allergies. Examples of “featherless” diets consist of only beef, fish, or rabbit.

Discuss your options with a licensed veterinarian.

Transition to the new food slowly, introducing 25% of the new food into meals for a few days. Then increase the new food portion to 50% and so on.

Tip 1: We suggest feline probiotics, like Forti Flora, to be added to all meals.

Tip 2: Soothe your kittens stomach by boiling chicken, turkey or lean beef in water. Do not season. Cut up. Add some plain canned pumpkin. This can be fed for a few days to soothe stomach and calm any irritation in bowels while you are pin pointing the cause of irritation. Consult your veterinarian if symptoms persist.


Does my kitty need litter box training?

Most kittens instinctually know to enter their litter box. Boxes attract kittens and cats of all size, and the litter helps them to bury their business - another instinctual habit of cats.

We recommend starting kittens in one small room, so their options are limited and their litter box is close by.

Once your kitten is introduced into your entire home, it is recommended to have more than one box, especially with multiple cats.

Cleaning the litter box twice a day, ensures your cat a clean and comfortable litter box experience and will help to avoid accidents.

Having box issues? Here is a great video to guide you in pin pointing the problem.

 

How can I make my kitten comfortable and happy?

Some kittens will be shy when entering a new home. Start them in one small, quiet room, with all their needs close by and a comfy place to hide and feel safe. Cat igloos and tunnels are great hiding spaces. A clean shipping box turned on it’s side, and filled with a kitty blanket will sometimes do the trick!

Comfy bedding, a place to hide, toys, scratching posts and places to climb all contribute to your kittens comfort while adjusting to your home. Their food, water and litter box should be nearby and always kept clean.

Interacting with your kitten using a mix of playtime and cuddles is important in building a bond. A purring kitten is always a great sign!

Confident kittens will take to exploring right away and will appreciate nooks, crannies and high points for more of a view. Cat window perches can be attached to your window by suction or mounted onto your sill. This allows for endless visual stimulation of sunshine, birds and the outdoor world while keeping your kitten safe inside.

Dog Care

What vaccines does my adult dog need and how often?

Rabies Vaccine - Rabies is a virus that may affect the brain and spinal cord of all mammals, including dogs, cats and humans. The most common carriers of the rabies virus in this country are bats, raccoons, skunks and foxes.

This vaccine should be given once a year or a 3-year vaccine can be offered. You may request a rabies certificate signed by a licensed veterinarian which is often required for dog training and day care programs

Bordatella Vaccine - Bordetella bronchiseptica also known as “kennel cough” causes inflammation of your dog’s upper respiratory system. This inflammation leads to coughing and illness and can expose your dog to secondary infections.

This vaccine should be given once a year.

DHPP Vaccine- protects puppies from sometimes fatal viruses like Distemper, Hepatitis, Parainfluenza, and Parvovirus. Sometimes referred to as a combo vaccine.

This vaccine should be given once a year.

What monthly prevention treatment does my adult dog need?

Flea Protection includes brands like Revolution, Vectra and Bravecto.

Continue monthly or use a specific 3-month dose. Doses are determined by weight.

Heartworm Prevention: Heartworms are among the most damaging parasites. They are transmitted by mosquitoes and, once mature, they live in the heart and large blood vessels of the lungs. Vomiting and coughing are two of the most common symptoms as well as labored breathing, convulsions, lethargy.

Since heartworm is NOT curable, monthly prevention is important. Preventative treatment includes brands like Heartgard, Interceptor and Revolution.

Doses are determined by weight.

What is tapeworm and how do I know if my dog has it?

Tapeworm is a parasite that can be easy to identify and treat. It can cause your pet to experience symptoms like lethargy, diarrhea, vomiting, and loss of appetite. You may notice your dog scooting his or her bottom on the ground to relieve irritation caused by the parasite.

Tapeworms usually develop after a dog swallows a flea that’s infected with the parasite’s larvae. You may notice small worms in your dog’s stool that resemble rice, or they may end up in the stomach as worms and show up in your dog’s vomit.

If your dog experiences any of the above symptoms, have their stool tested by a veterinarian and treat the parasite with de-worming medication like Pyrantel and Panacur.

What kind of routine tests should I make sure my dog receives?

Fecal tests will reveal parasites that can be causing discomfort to your pet and harm to their health. Recommended to test when symptoms arise and annually.

Heartworm tests are recommended to test when symptoms arise and annually. This is especially important for dogs who spend a lot of time outside and in areas with mosquitos.

Wellness exams will review the health of your dog’s skin and coat, gums and teeth, ears and eyes, weight and energy level. This is a chance to review any issues or questions you may have about maintaining your dog’s health with a professional veterinarian. Adult dogs should have yearly wellness exams. Seniors and puppies are recommended for a visit twice a year.

Other tests may be recommended by your veterinarian depending on your dog’s age and condition. These may include urine and blood tests, or skin cultures.

Dogs and food allergies - what are the signs?

If your dog is vomiting after eating, losing appetite or showing other signs of irriation (like excessive scratching), this could link to food allergies.

After testing is done by a veterinarian to rule out parasites and fleas, your dog’s food may be the cause of the problem.

Allergies to feathered protein, like chicken or turkey are common. Try single protein foods to rule out allergies. Examples of “featherless” diets consist of only beef, rabbit, or pork.

Discuss your options with a licensed veterinarian.

Transition to the new food slowly, introducing 25% of the new food into meals for a few days. Then increase the new food portion to 50% and so on.

Tip 1: We suggest canine probiotics, like Forti Flora, to be added to all meals.

Tip 2: Soothe your puppies stomach by boiling chicken, turkey or lean beef in water. Do not season. Add cooked rice and plain canned pumpkin. This can be fed for a few days to soothe stomach and calm any irritation in bowels while you are pin pointing the cause of irritation.

What else can I do to keep my dog healthy and happy?

Healthy teeth - gently brushing your dogs teeth and gums, even for a few seconds a day, help eliminate harmful bacteria and plaque build up. There are many fun flavored dog-safe toothpaste you can try.

Healthy ears - gently wipe away debris and dirt inside your dogs ear using a soft cotton pad. Do not touch the ear canal or use any hard or pointed objects.

Healthy coat and skin - weekly baths with gentle and all natural pet shampoos and conditioners are a great way to keep your dog clean and dander free. Remember to rinse off well and keep avoid sending water inside ears.

Healthy nails - frequent exercise on concrete is a natural way to keep your dog’s nails short. Using a dog-safe nail clipper, carefully trim the tips of your dogs nail, above the cuticle. Nails protruding past your dog’s paw pads are considered too long and can effect your dog’s gait and legs.

Review these practices with a licensed veterinarian before attempting.

Exercise & stimulation are important components to your dog’s physical and mental health. Daily long walks or runs, weekly hikes or exploring new places together are all valuable activities for cardiovascular health. The age and breed of your dog plays a role in how much activity they need. Playing a simple game of fetch or tug o’ war stimulate and excite your dog, adding to their mental well being. Dog parks and group dog classes are also recommended for social stimulation.

Love & Attention is just as important to your dog’s health as food and exercise. Dogs are social companion animals. They thrive on the attention and praise of people. Spend time each day praising your dog, cuddling and simply staying close by. From using a kind, warm tone of voice, to offering belly rubs - there are many easy ways to give your pet the love and intention they need.

Cat Care

What vaccines does my adult cat need and how often?

Rabies Vaccine - Rabies is a virus that may affect the brain and spinal cord of all mammals, including dogs, cats and humans. The most common carriers of the rabies virus in this country are bats, raccoons, skunks and foxes.

This vaccine should be given once a year or a 3-year vaccine can be offered.

FVRCP Vaccine - protects cats from viruses like rhinotracheitis, calicivirus and panleukopenia. Sometimes referred to as a combo vaccine.

This vaccine should be given once a year.

What monthly prevention treatment does my adult cat need?

Flea Protection includes brands like Revolution, Vectra and Bravecto.

Continue monthly or use a specific 3-month dose. Doses are determined by weight.

Heartworm Prevention: Heartworms are among the most damaging parasites. They are transmitted by mosquitoes and, once mature, they live in the heart and large blood vessels of the lungs. Vomiting and coughing are two of the most common symptoms as well as labored breathing, convulsions, lethargy.

Since heartworm is NOT curable, monthly prevention is important. Preventative treatment includes brands like Heartgard, Interceptor and Revolution.

Doses are determined by weight.

What is tapeworm and how do I know if my cat has it?

Tapeworm is a parasite that can be easy to identify and treat. It can cause your pet to experience symptoms like lethargy, diarrhea, vomiting, and loss of appetite. You may notice your pet scooting his or her bottom on the ground to relieve irritation caused by the parasite.

Tapeworms usually develop after your pet swallows a flea that’s infected with the parasite’s larvae. You may notice small worms in your cat’s stool that resemble rice, or they may end up in the stomach as worms and show up in your cat’s vomit.

If your cat experiences any of the above symptoms, have their stool tested by a veterinarian and treat the parasite with de-worming medication like Pyrantel and Panacur.

What kind of routine tests should I make sure my cat receives?

Fecal tests will reveal parasites that can be causing discomfort to your pet and harm to their health. Recommended to test when symptoms arise and annually.

FELV/FIV tests reveal a feline leukemia disease and feline immunodeficiency virus (contagious to cats). Newly adopted or rescued cats should be tested. Any outdoor cats coming into your home should be tested. Continue tests yearly.

Heartworm tests are recommended to test when symptoms arise and annually. This is especially important for cats who spend a lot of time outside and in areas with mosquitos.

Wellness exams will review the health of your cat’s skin and coat, gums and teeth, ears and eyes, weight and energy level. This is a chance to review any issues or questions you may have about maintaining your dog’s health with a professional veterinarian. Adult cats should have yearly wellness exams. Seniors and kittens are recommended for a visit twice a year.

Other tests may be recommended by your veterinarian depending on your cat’s age and condition. These may include urine and blood tests, or skin cultures.

Cat and food allergies - what are the signs?

If your cat is vomiting after eating, losing appetite or showing other signs of irriation (like excessive scratching), this could link to food allergies.

After testing is done by a veterinarian to rule out parasites and fleas, your cat’s food may be the cause of the problem.

Allergies to feathered protein, like chicken or turkey are common. Try single protein foods to rule out allergies. Examples of “featherless” diets consist of only beef, rabbit, or salmon.

Discuss your options with a licensed veterinarian.

Transition to the new food slowly, introducing 25% of the new food into meals for a few days. Then increase the new food portion to 50% and so on.

Tip 1: We suggest feline probiotics, like Forti Flora, to be added to all meals.

Tip 2: Soothe your cat’s stomach by temporarily cooking bland diet recommended by your veterinarian.

What else can I do to keep my cat healthy and happy?

Healthy teeth - gently brushing your cat’s teeth and gums, even for a few seconds a day, help eliminate harmful bacteria and plaque build up. There are many fun flavored cat-safe toothpaste you can try and small brushes made just for kitties/

Healthy ears - gently wipe away debris and dirt inside your cats ear using a soft cotton pad. Do not touch the ear canal or use any hard or pointed objects.

Healthy coat and skin - cats are built to groom themselves with their unique tongue and saliva. It is not necessary to bathe a cat for regular maintainance.

Healthy nails - Cats will inherently find ways to scratch and shed their nails. Providing scratching posts, cat trees and scratch boards will help your cat’s nails stay dull and fulfill their scratching desires. If your cat’s nails are sharp, use a cat-safe nail clipper and carefully trim the tips above the cuticle. If your cat isn’t used to trimming, it is recommended to attempt when your cat is relaxed or sleepy. Some cats may need a visit to the vet or groomer instead.

Review these practices with a licensed veterinarian before attempting.

Exercise & stimulation are important components to your cat’s physical and mental health. Places to both climb and hide are all part of a cat’s comfort and stimulation. Provide boxes or cat iglooes to hide in. Set up window perches or hammocks at a window to gaze outside. Cat trees or shelving allow your cat to climb and build confidence. Catnip, feather wands and toy mice or balls are also fun ways to excite the hunter in your cat. Setting up a bird feeder outside a window provides lots of visual excitement for your kitties without harming any birds!

Love & Attention is just as important to your cat’s health as food and exercise. Despite the independent nature of cats, they have a full capacity to be social companion animals. Cats can be very chatty and curious friends! Spend time each day praising your kitty with brushing, petting, and simply staying close by. From using a kind, warm tone of voice to napping with them, there are many easy ways to give your pet the love and intention they need.

What to do if...*Coming soon*

Your pet has separation anxiety..

Your pet displays aggression towards other animals or people..

You find an injured or sick cat or dog..

You witness animal abuse or neglect..

You want to help community feral cats..